glitteringgoldie:

Reminder that there is a real statue of Cornelius Coot in Disneyworld.

glitteringgoldie:

Reminder that there is a real statue of Cornelius Coot in Disneyworld.

terridelgado:

tmiaustralia:

onlyblackgirl:

shelbysbutt:

aanubis:

ungrammaticholiday:

yggdrasilly:

christmasblogger:

Penguin falls down resulting in best sound ever [x]

oh my god

NOOOOOOO

they all gasped like OHHH

IM CRYING IM PHYSICALLY CRYING HE FALLS AND THERE ALL LIKE WHAAAAWHOA U OK BRO AND HE GETS UP LIKE *SIGH* YEAH ITS FINE

I just watched this like 8 times

Jumping on the laughing bandwagon with this one!

I will always reblog this

bonitavista:

West Virginia
photo via louise

bonitavista:

West Virginia

photo via louise

bonitavista:

Lake Tahoe, California
photo via debbie

bonitavista:

Lake Tahoe, California

photo via debbie

Some thoughts for encouragement

If you have a conscience and compassion, you have value. If you’ve looked into someone’s eyes and smiled or nodded hello, then you have made an impact. You matter to someone. If you’ve petted a dog or cat or rabbit or horse or bird, you matter. Every connection you make with another living creature is precious. Every time you write down an idea or share something with a friend or even a stranger, you leave an impression. You are unique. No one else is exactly like you, and no one ever will be.

bonitavista:

Oregon
photo via gail

bonitavista:

Oregon

photo via gail

bonitavista:

Schwarzwald, Germany
photo via ecaprii

bonitavista:

Schwarzwald, Germany

photo via ecaprii

bonitavista:

Glencoe, Scotland
photo via suesy

bonitavista:

Glencoe, Scotland

photo via suesy

afloweroutofstone:

Responses with more than 50 karma include responses from Australia, Brazil (?), Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, Greece, Honduras, Finland, India, Iran, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palestine, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. The following testimonials stood out to me. Bolding is mine.

u/IranianGenius:

In Iran, there were candlelight vigils all over the country. There was a moment of silence at a soccer game as well. The way I remember, they focused mostly on the loss of life; innocent people clearly never deserve a fate like that.

u/Gtexx:

I remember that a math test was cancelled the next day, my teacher saying “we are all too shocked to study”. I also remember the front page of Le Monde saying “Nous sommes tous américains” (“We are all american”).

u/iNebulaDragon:

Slovenia, I was really young at the time and my father worked at the news station. He called my mother from his work and told her to turn on the CNN. My mother and father love watching new movies, so my mother was confused at first, asking herself why would my father recommend a such horrible movie. Then she realized that was not a movie.

u/Shelleywarwick:

Well at the time I worked in a large Australian supermarket, the largest in the country. As the event was unfolding, the coverage was just unprecedented. The supermarket that day was completely empty. I have never seen anything like it before or after. The staff stood glued to TV screens. A phrase that stuck with me was one of the commentators saying “well one thing is for certain, life as we know it is over.” Which was very true. At first the coverage was unsure of what was going on, but when the realization that t was an act of terror sunk in, it was more of a feeling of disbelief. It took a little while for the media coverage to turn from the immediate events to looking forward and analyzing the actual impact of the events. EDIT more info Well personally my first thoughts were for my cousin, she is a New Yorker. I was coming on shift at 5am, I can’t remember what time Australian the attacks occurred. Customers started to come in in the morning but some left discarded trolleys of food and just went home to watch the coverage. By 8am the store was empty and stayed that way all day. The reason that the commentators comment sticks with me today, is that as a 20year old, I truly didn’t understand what he obviously did, the way aviation and anti-terrorism measures etc would change. Also, the feeling that “if it could happen there, it could happen anywhere” was very strong here. We led a very charmed existence before 9/11. It was also my first real exposure to the idea that people we don’t even know, could want to kill us! To me that was very sobering.

u/lolzfeminism:

I grew up in Istanbul, Turkey. Though I was 10 at the time, I remember watching the chaos at Ground Zero on TV. I remember a lot of footage of search & rescue looking for survivors in the rubble. This may be a false memory, but I vaguely recall being really scared when I saw a crying woman being helped by Firemen on TV. I think it was the thought being stuck under rubble that scared me. There was speculation that the US would start a war with Afghanistan. For the next two weeks all news channels talked about 9/11, Bush, Taliban and Al-Qaeda 100% of the time.

The coverage universally condemned Al-Qaeda and offered sympathy to the loved ones of the victims. I remember at least one interview on TV in the following days with a Turkish muslim cleric who was condemning Al-Qaeda, saying that what they did had no place in Islam.

I recall feeling some sort of shame inside, like I was guilty by association; these people who shared my religion had done something horrible.

When I went to school the next day, our teacher took some time to talk about how deplorable Al-Qaeda was. Someone asked if the US was going invade Turkey and our teacher assured us that we were safe, even if the US invaded Afghanistan and that the US would never invade Turkey.

u/_edge_case:

I’m an American but I would like to relay the experience I had in France in 2001. I was on leave from the US Navy on 9/11 and in the Normandy region of France enjoying a leisurely Christmas with my father, touring all of the WWII invasion sites around Normandy. We were in a restaurant on the coast having moules frites when the owner came over and told me in French that something terrible had happened in New York. I knew immediately it was a terrorist attack when she told me that two planes had hit both towers…I stood up in the middle of the small restaurant and was having a borderline panic attack. My father is ex-military and he knew what I was feeling…I needed to be back with my unit, to be with my buddies and to be ready. I had the only panic attack of my life right there in the middle of that coastal French restaurant.

Something amazing started to happen. The 8 or 10 people, local French couples and families, all stopped what they were doing and came over to comfort us. Two women were crying. I started crying. One of the local girls grabbed me and hugged me and I sobbed like I hadn’t done in years…certainly not in front of other people, and absolutely not in front of strangers. This seemed like it lasted forever, but was probably only a few seconds.

Everyone moved their tables to be in some semblance of a circle, and we all finished our meals in relative silence. The husband and wife restaurant owners broke out acaseof Burgundy on the house and we all started drinking together. Eventually, about 8 of us walked down to the beach and told stories of France, America, what it was like in the Normandy region during and after WWII, and what we were going to do next. Bottle after bottle of Burgundy was consumed, and Dad and I eventually just passed out on the beach and slept until morning.

Vive la France, and to this day I will have words with anyone who says anything close to “Oh, the French are so rude and don’t like Americans.” I went on to serve multiple tours with my unit fighting the war on terror in the middle east…whatever that means…and luckily lived through it, while many of my buddies didn’t. But thank you Michele and Corinne, wherever you are. Dad and I will never forget that night, both for the tragedy our nation and the world suffered at the hands of a few cowards, and also for your kindness and compassion towards two foreign strangers.

The head of a company survived 9/11 because
His son started kindergarten.
Another fellow was alive because it was
His turn to bring donuts.
One woman was late because her
Alarm clock didn’t go off in time.
One was late because of being stuck on the NJ Turnpike
Because of an auto accident.
One of them
Missed his bus.
One spilled food on her clothes and had to take
Time to change.
One’s
Car wouldn’t start.
One couldn’t
Get a taxi.
The one that struck me was the man
Who put on a new pair of shoes that morning,
Took the various means to get to work but before.
He got there, he developed a blister on his foot.
He stopped at a drugstore to buy a Band-Aid.
That is why he is alive today..
Now when I am
Stuck in traffic,
Miss an elevator,
Turn back to answer a ringing telephone…
All the little things that annoy me,
I think to myself,
This is exactly where
I’m meant to be
At this very moment
(via causeimtabitha)